Christmas In Finicky Feeding Land!

Yes, I know.  Technically, Christmas day was 5 days ago, but I’m one of those who likes to celebrate the full 12 days of Christmas.  And my kids don’t mind too much either.   I think it’s because of the music and the food.  After all, this is a season of amazingly good (and rich) food, and there is nothing easier to get a kid to eat than a cookie they helped to make.  Especially when you’re dancing to music while you bake.

Yes, it’s true, I let A help me with our Christmas cookies this year.  Crazy? Probably.  Worth it? Definitely.

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She touched it!

Let’s face it, you don’t get much more sensory intensive than mixing, rolling, and sprinkling cookie dough.  Okay, so she didn’t exactly help with the rolling part, but she did touch the dough and was quite proud of herself for doing so.

She helped squash them with the glass (great for the “heavy work” end of therapy).  Yes, I kept a hand on the cup.  Real glass and tile floors don’t play well together.

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Then it was time for sprinkles.  Who doesn’t love sprinkles?  Great for fine motor skills (hello pincer grasp!) and motor control (on the cookies not the baking sheet if you please!).

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Who knew baking could be so therapeutic?

Of course, she had to find something to amuse herself  for the 12 minutes it took for the cookies to bake and the 15 minutes it took for them to cool.  Thank the Lord for puzzles!

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And, yes, she does those on her own.  I wish I was making that up but my almost 3 year old is rather bright (not parental bias people, I have the assessments to prove it!).

After all that hard work, it’s time for taste testing!  With a nice cup of cold milk of course!

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“Yummy, yummy in tummy!”

Actually, she didn’t eat that cookie.  A decided she wanted gingerbread biscotti instead so she fed her cookie to me.   No complaints here!

What’s that?  She ate biscotti?  My super picky, super sensitive child ate hard, crunchy biscotti?

Yes, yes she did.  Only it wasn’t that hard and crunchy.  And there was white chocolate involved.

It’s a recipe that I found in a Family Fun magazine for kid-friendly, easy to make holiday treats.  And yes, it is actually very easy.  Here’s the link for the recipe: http://www.parents.com/recipe/gingerbread-biscotti/

While traditional Christmas dinner is definitely not A’s cup of tea, I have found ways around that thanks to the variety of seasonal foods that I love to make.  Granted, her Christmas dinner consisted of a GoGo Squeeze (I don’t think I would survive without those), 2 herb rolls (homemade, time consuming, but very yummy), PediaSure, and egg nog.

Yes, egg nog.  We have discovered that A absolutely loves egg nog.  How much?  Well, she guzzles it; and I mean that in the truest sense of the word.  She can down 4oz of the stuff faster than anything (sorry, the analogy portion of my brain has officially shut down for the night).

Her favorite thing though, is “Crumbly Cake.”  It’s actually called Railway Crumb Cake, but crumbly cake was easier for G to say when he was little, so the name stuck.  It is one of the easiest things to make (I’ve been making it since I was about 9 years old) and it is so delicious.  Another bonus is that it makes the house smell wonderful.  Both my kids love helping, both with the making and with the eating.  This has become my family’s traditional Christmas morning breakfast (we use it on Thanksgiving also) just because it is so easy.  It takes about 30-35minutes to bake so you do have to plan ahead it you want it freshly made in the morning, but it is worth it.  I haven’t seen this recipe anywhere since I read it in a Pockets magazine when I was 9 (yes, it was a while ago); so here it is if anyone fancies giving it a go.

2 cups flour (all-purpose)

1 cup sugar

3/4 cup butter

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

1 egg

1 cup buttermilk

Combine the flour, sugar, and butter in a large bowl until mixture resembles crumbs.  Set aside 1 cup of this mixture for topping.  To the remainder of the crumbs, add the baking soda, cinnamon, cloves, and nutmeg.  Mix well.  Make a well in the center and add the egg and buttermilk.  Stir gently until just combined.  Pour in to a greased 9.5in pie plate and top the 1 cup of crumbs that was set aside at the start.  Bake at 350F for 30-35 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.  Let cool, then slice and serve.  Serves 8.

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This was ours about 15 minutes after it came out of the oven Christmas morning.  The kids wanted this before they opened their presents.  I’d say it’s because they like it so much (which they do), but I think the real reason is they wanted to be able to play uninterrupted after opening presents.

Suffice it to say, it’s always a big hit and A has actually been eating because of it.  I would make it year round, but for me it really is a Thanksgiving/Christmas time only food.  Guess I’ll just have to hunt down some regular crumb or coffee cake type recipes for the rest of the year!

In the meantime, happy eating and even happier Christmas!

 

 

 

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One Small Hop for a Munchkin…

One giant party for Momma!  Yes, my two and a half year old daughter who could not jump, did so today.  It was a small hop but both feet left the floor and she didn’t fall on her little butt so it counts as a victory in my book.

On the downside, we’re still struggling with food.  I made the sweet potato pizza for A but she didn’t like it very much.  Okay, she didn’t really like it at all.  Given the nature of the dough, it stays rather soft and A didn’t like that.  G, on the other hand, did.  He thought it was really good but said that in needed veggies on top to give it a better flavor.  Oh well, at least one of my kiddos liked it.

After a weeks worth of extra visits for feeding and occupational therapy evaluations and a visit to the nutritionist, I have learned that we are on the right track.  Despite A’s limited tolerance for a variety of foods, we have still managed to give her a somewhat balanced diet.  Is it ideal? No, not really since she neglects whole food groups, but through liberal use of homemade fruit and veggie smoothies she is still getting what she needs.  All we have to do now is up her caloric intake.  Thankfully, it is doable if A cooperates.

Oh, wait, I’m asking for a two year old’s cooperation.  Nevermind.  This may be a bit of a challenge.  That’s okay.  It will just force me to be more creative.  Good exercise for my brain!

Well, I have been attempting to procrastinate again with this blog, but I am so tired after a long day of therapy (A’s, not mine people!) and more paperwork (that I still have to finish) that my spelling is becoming atrocious (thank you spell check for saving me) and my grammer isn’t to far behind.  So before I embarrass myself and anyone who ever taught me (especially my mother) I will leave you with the recipe for the sweet potato pizza if anyone wants to give it a go.

1 large or two small sweet potatoes  (app. 1½-2 cups prepared) peeled, cut into chunks
• 1½-2 cups flour (preferably whole wheat)
• 2 tsp baking powder
• generous measure of basil, oregano and thyme (or other seasoning to taste)
• app 4 Tbsp cold water mixed with 2 Tbsp virgin olive oil

  • Boil the sweet potato in a large pan of water for about 15 minutes until very soft. Drain well, return to the pan and mash with a potato masher until smooth. Set aside to cool.
  • Preheat the oven to 400F. Place sweet potato in a large bowl. Add the flour, baking powder and seasoning.
  • Stir in the water and oil mixture with a large spoon until the dough comes together it should be soft and spongy. Knead lightly to form into a large ball – adding a little extra flour if the mixture seems too sticky.
  • Divide the dough into two equal balls and roll out on a lightly floured board into two circles around 2cm thick. Lift carefully onto two lightly oiled baking sheets. Brush lightly with oil. Spread one of the pizzas with your choice of sauce and toppings.
  • Place both pizzas in the oven, with the topped pizza above the plain base. Bake the topped pizza for around 25 minutes until well risen and lightly browned. Cook the plain base for 15 minutes until golden and cooked then remove and allow to cool.
  • Once cool, top with sauce and choice of toppings, cover loosely in foil and freeze on the tray. The next day remove from tray and wrap tightly in foil. To cook, remove foil, place on a lightly oiled baking tray and bake from frozen in a preheated oven at 400F for 15-18 minutes until hot.

Enjoy!